Degenerative Myelopathy(DM) is a progressive degenerative genetic neurological disease. There is no known cure, BUT,- THERE IS GOOD NEWS. Several studies have demonstrated that directed physical therapy/fitness can extend  the quality survival time by more than 2.5 years. As well as slow the progression of the disease.

Important to note is that  all of the cases of degenerative myelopathy that I have treated in my practice have had concurrent inter-vertebral disc disease(IVDD) or spinal arthritis.  Unlike degenerative myelopathy, IVDD can be painful, but more importantly it can be treated. Thereby improving comfort and clinical signs despite also having degenerative myelopathy.

You may not be aware that your Corgi has IVDD or spinal discomfort.  It is very important to have your Corgi evaluated by a veterinary chiropractor/osteopath. In my practice I recommend having your Corgi evaluated at least annually by the age of 4 years old.

IT IS IMPORTANT TO KEEP THE SPINE IN GOOD ALIGNMENT AND MOBILITY THROUGHOUT YOUR CORGI’S LIFE

Corgi SkeletonFUN FACT #1-  Any dog regardless of breed is only 15% skeleton by mass. That means that at least 75% of the dog is soft tissue, muscles, ligaments and tendons.  We can treat and improve those tissues through the dog’s whole life.

One great way to keep the spine and soft tissue healthy is passive range of motion. Please download our free PDF below.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE PDF DOWNLOAD : Passive Range of Motion

 

Video of Passive Range of Motion on an active young Corgi.

 

FUN FACT # 2- You miss more for not looking than not knowing. Meaning you do not need to be an expert in canine structure and anatomy to notice changes in your dog’s posture and stance. You should take photos from  3 positions every year to six months.  The photos should be from the side front and rear.  Take the photo in the same location  with the same holder.  From the photos you will be able to note changes in posture and stance. Seek veterinary chiropractic advice if you do notice changes. This is a sign that something that there has been a change in the health of your Corgi’s spine or structure.

 

But Standing of Course

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART 2 TO FOLLOW

 

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